Christmas Tree Facts

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Christmas Tree Quick Facts

  • There are approximately 35 million real Christmas trees sold in North America every year.
  • North American real Christmas trees are grown in all 50 states and Canada. Most artificial trees are manufactured in Korea, Taiwan, or Hong Kong.
  • There are about 40 acres in production for growing fresh, live Christmas trees in Santa’s Holiday Forest. Each acre provides the daily oxygen requirements for 18 people.
  • Live Christmas trees are a renewable, recyclable resource. Artificial trees contain non-biodegradable plastics and possible metal toxins such as lead, cadmium, and organotin compounds.
  • Consumers can locate the nearest Christmas tree recycling program by logging onto www.realchristmastrees.org or calling 1-800-CLEANUP (1-800-253-2687).
  • For every real Christmas tree harvested, 2 to 3 seedlings are planted in its place the following spring.
  • There are about 15,000 real Christmas tree growers in North America, employing over 100,000 people full or part-time in the industry.
  • It can take as many as 15 years to grow a tree of average retail sale height (6 feet), but the average growing time is 7 years.

 

Holiday Safety Facts

  • According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), only a little more than approximately one-tenth of one percent (.012%) of residential fires involve a real Christmas tree.
  • According to NFPA data, of all the real Christmas trees enjoyed during the holiday season, fewer than one-one-thousandth of one percent (0.001%) are involved in a residential fire.
  • Real Christmas Trees are not as likely to be the first item ignited in residential fires as many other common household items:
    Newspapers and magazines – 13 times more likely
    Boxes or bags – 10 times more likely
    Curtains or drapes – 9 times more likely
    Linens – 8 times more likely
    Cleaning supplies – 3 times more likely
    Clothing on a person – 2 times more likely
  • At no time can a real Christmas tree start a fire. Ignition sources are always external.

 

  • According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), only a little more than approximately one-tenth of one percent (.012%) of residential fires involve a real Christmas tree.
  • According to NFPA data, of all the real Christmas trees enjoyed during the holiday season, fewer than one-one-thousandth of one percent (0.001%) are involved in a residential fire.
  • Real Christmas Trees are not as likely to be the first item ignited in residential fires as many other common household items:
    Newspapers and magazines – 13 times more likely
    Boxes or bags – 10 times more likely
    Curtains or drapes – 9 times more likely
    Linens – 8 times more likely
    Cleaning supplies – 3 times more likely
    Clothing on a person – 2 times more likely
  • At no time can a real Christmas tree start a fire. Ignition sources are always external.

 

Holiday Safety Precautions

  • Select the freshest-looking real Christmas tree available.
  • Make a fresh cut across the tree’s base and immediately place in water. Keep the tree’s water container full at all times, checking the water level daily.
  • Be extra careful with electricity, all open flames, and other heat sources during the holidays.
  • Check all Christmas tree lights, other electric decorations, and electrical appliances for wear (frayed cords, for example). Do not use lights, decorations, or appliances with worn electrical cords.
  • Unplug tree lights and other decorations when out of the room or sleeping.

 

After Christmas Tips

  • Select the freshest-looking real Christmas tree available.
  • Make a fresh cut across the tree’s base and immediately place in water. Keep the tree’s water container full at all times, checking the water level daily.
  • Be extra careful with electricity, all open flames, and other heat sources during the holidays.
  • Check all Christmas tree lights, other electric decorations, and electrical appliances for wear (frayed cords, for example). Do not use lights, decorations, or appliances with worn electrical cords.
  • Unplug tree lights and other decorations when out of the room or sleeping.

 

  • Select the freshest-looking real Christmas tree available.
  • Make a fresh cut across the tree’s base and immediately place in water. Keep the tree’s water container full at all times, checking the water level daily.
  • Be extra careful with electricity, all open flames, and other heat sources during the holidays.
  • Check all Christmas tree lights, other electric decorations, and electrical appliances for wear (frayed cords, for example). Do not use lights, decorations, or appliances with worn electrical cords.
  • Unplug tree lights and other decorations when out of the room or sleeping.

 

Which tree is right for me?

Which variety of live Christmas tree should you buy? Here is a helpful guide to several of the most popular varieties of live Christmas trees.

 

Santa’s Holiday Forest has fresh, real Christmas trees starting at $24.95.

Fraser Fir

Out of all the varieties of Christmas trees, the Fraser Fir is considered one of the most fragrant and having beautiful coloring. The Fraser Fir is dark green with a silver coloring on the underside of the needles, giving it a great depth of color when displaying. The Fraser Fir takes 7 to 10 years to reach its mature size, and requires more care as it grows.

Needles

The needles of a Fraser Fir are short and soft to the touch, and their unique blend of dark green and silver undertones give it a vibrant and colorful look. Stiff, open branches are a Fraser Fir trademark, so they can easily hold all types of ornaments and will showcase them beautifully.

Recommendations

You can’t go wrong with a Fraser Fir. A great, all-purpose live Christmas tree, it holds all types of ornaments — big and small, light and heavy — and has the space to display lights brightly. And with great needle retention, you will spend more time enjoying this tree than cleaning up after it.

Scotch Pine

The Scotch Pine is a live Christmas tree favorite here in the Midwest, typically taking 6 to 8 years to reach a height of 7 to 8 feet. The Scotch Pine has a bright green color, retains its needles very well, and will remain fresh throughout the holiday season.

Needles

The Scotch Pine has long needles (approximately one to three inches) that are attached to the stem in pairs and are slightly prickly to the touch. Scotch pines have excellent needle retention and unlike the needles of spruces, when dried out, Scotch Pine needles tend to remain on the branches.

Recommendations

The Scotch Pine can handle the “heavy lifting.” It’s wide-spaced branches are very stiff and are well suited for heavy ornaments. If you prefer bigger, bolder lights, this tree can showcase them easily. Since the branches are very full, delicate or smaller ornaments might get overwhelmed by the sturdy branches. Scotch Pines are moderately fragrant and create a gentle, pleasant pine smell.

White Pine

Similar to the Scotch Pine, the White Pine is also a live Christmas tree favorite because of its full branches and long needles. In fact, the White Pine has the longest needles at nearly 3-5 inches in length. The White Pine grows well with little fertilization needed and grows to full size in about 6-8 years. Growing to its full size in 6 to 8 years, the soft green color is a White Pine trademark, as is its own unique fragrance, which is slightly stronger than the Scotch Pine.

Needles

White Pine needles are very long but very soft. They attach in bundles of 5 needles, and retain well on the branches..

Recommendations

Because the branches and needles of a White Pine are soft and full, this is an excellent tree for displaying light ornaments and light-weight lights. For the same reasons, they are not well-suited for heavy ornaments or lights.